Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption

The movie just came out and I haven’t seen it yet. But I will. I don’t doubt that it is fantastic given the source material, but I am certain that the book is even better, which is probably true for most book to movie adaptations.

For those of you unfamiliar with both the book and the movie here is the description from Goodreads (I edited some because it seemed like it gave quite a bit away):

“On a May afternoon in 1943, an Army Air Corps bomber crashed into the Pacific Ocean and disappeared, leaving only a spray of debris and a slick of oil, gasoline, and blood. Then, on the ocean surface, a face appeared. It was that of a young lieutenant, the plane’s bombardier, who was struggling to a life raft and pulling himself aboard. So began one of the most extraordinary odysseys of the Second World War.

The lieutenant’s name was Louis Zamperini. He started out as a cunning delinquent boy but channeled his defiance into running, which took him to the Berlin Olympics. But when war had come, the athlete had become an airman which lead to his crash into the ocean. 

Ahead of Zamperini lay thousands of miles of open ocean, leaping sharks, a foundering raft, thirst and starvation, enemy aircraft, and, beyond, a trial even greater. Driven to the limits of endurance, Zamperini would answer desperation with ingenuity; suffering with hope, resolve, and humor; brutality with rebellion. His fate, whether triumph or tragedy, would be suspended on the fraying wire of his will.

Telling an unforgettable story of a man’s journey into extremity, Unbroken is a testament to the resilience of the human mind, body, and spirit. “

That sums it up pretty well, but if you want to know what I thought here is my review.

Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and RedemptionUnbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I am humbled by the lives presented in this book, amazed at their strength, fortitude, and ability to forgive. They have spurred some self-reflection. Louis Zamperini and so many others endured indescribable pains and tortures both physically and mentally. They survived years of cruelty. They did not come out unscathed, but they came out. And over time they made themselves better because of their experience. My personal struggles look like mole-hills when contrasted with the mountains they faced. But they never stopped climbing and so the message I found in the book was not one of darkness despite the horrors that occurred. Instead I was inspired and motivated.

I want to respond to the events and difficulties in my life with the same dignity, courage, and tenacity I read about. These amazing people lived through hell and came out the other side willing to teach and help others, and if they can do that then I can be a force for good in my life that is pretty much heaven compared to the atrocities of war. I am so grateful for the sacrifices of others that make my heaven possible.

The author is a great storyteller, mixing in the biographical with little known facts and statistics. I had no idea how risky being in the air corps was, and while I knew that physical treatment of POW’s was beyond horrific, my eyes were opened to the mental and emotional manipulation that also went on. Hillenbrand brings out the information that makes this story about more than just one man’s experience. And she does it entertainingly. The book reads much more like a thriller than a biography.

As a runner myself I completely connected with Zamperini and the role running played in his development and survival. He is a true olympian and hero.

This is one of those books that you finish reading but then think about for days. It is a life-changer and a person-changer.

View all my reviews
Age Recommendation: 16 or older. This is not one for the faint of heart. Some 16 year olds may not be able to handle the stark realities presented, but it’s all worth it to become acquainted with the greatness in people.

Appropriateness: There is some swearing, soldier talk. It didn’t bother me. The story needs to be told and strong language is necessary to get the point across. There is description of war and cruel treatment which was the reality of the events. With that in mind consider carefully the members of your group before selecting it for book club or for the classroom. Some readers may be bothered by such harshness, but you can probably guess my opinion. This really happened and when you get to know the man that it happened too you will be better for it.

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3 thoughts on “Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption

  1. Pingback: The Perfect Mile | The Reader's Salon

  2. Pingback: When Breath Becomes Air | The Reader's Salon

  3. Pingback: A Man Called Ove | The Reader's Salon

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