Blackmoore

BlackmooreBlackmoore by Julianne Donaldson

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I was in the mood for something on the lighter side when I picked up Blackmoore at the library. I read Edenbrooke by Julianne Donaldson a few years ago and enjoyed the romance and twists and turns of the story. It was clean but with plenty of passion and the writing was not annoyingly cliche or dumbed-down. In fact it was quite good for this genre. So I had high hopes for Blackmoore.

All of the same positive elements of Edenbrooke were there and I liked the book overall, but there were some aspects that I struggled with. My biggest issue – pacing. The characters were likable and the plot felt unique which is a pretty remarkable feat in the regency/romance genre, but the rate at which the plot was revealed and the conflict resolved was completely skewed. It’s pretty obvious from the start that there is romantic attachment between Kate Worthington and Henry Delafield and it’s also clear that some kind of drama has occurred to keep Kate from being open to her love for Henry. The author has created the suspense in the plot by gradually revealing the secrets behind these impediments. Unfortunately, the timing of the revelations were so frustrating!

For 150 pages we get tiny glimpses into the issues; there was some kind of scandal involving Kate’s sister, her mother is shameful and completely inappropriate in her behavior, and Henry’s mother disapproves of an attachment for these reasons and others that are barely hinted at. We know something major happened to Kate years ago that triggered some major changes in her feelings about herself, her future, and her relationship with Henry. But for 150 pages that’s all we know. We are teased over and over with minuscule references to these major and crucial plot developments, but nothing is actually developed. I guess that’s not completely true – we do get some insight into how Kate and Henry’s relationship has developed, but then we hit a brick wall as soon as we approach any point where the conflict began.

I get that pacing and suspense are desired story elements. I get that revealing details slowly is a good writing technique, but after reading this book I know there is such a thing as too little and too slow. I wasn’t really into the book until about 125 pages in because there were too many secrets and I wasn’t being let in on any of them. It was like being on the outside of an inside joke. Annoying. At one point there is mention that the woodlark is meaningful in Kate and Henry’s relationship, but then that meaning isn’t explained for almost 50 pages. It would have been so much more engaging and less annoying to have just given that explanation at the first reference.

Which leads into the next pacing problem. Once the revelations start at page 149 they come pretty much all at once. After the famine of information through the first half of the book we get 88 pages of flood. There are 7 flashbacks comprising 38 pages. A lot of that could have been revealed in the first half of the book and the plot development would have been more balanced and more engaging. The suspense would have still been there but even more effective. I also wasn’t sold on the whole idea of flashbacks for revealing the information because they all happened at once. If they had been spread more equally throughout the book they would have been more effective and less weird.

Not only was the lack of detail frustrating for me through the first half of the book but it was also a bit confusing. I couldn’t grasp the “vibe” of the book. It was classified as a regency romance so I was expecting romance (obviously) and some drama keeping it from blooming, but without some details surrounding the drama I couldn’t nail down what to expect. There was all this allusion to family drama so I wondered is this going about dysfunctional family? Like ‘The Glass Castle’ by Jeanette Wells but in regency times? Then there was all the description of smuggling, haunted moors and estates, and even a naturalist connecting with birding so I thought maybe it was supposed to be channeling more of a ‘Bronte’ vibe. The feel of the book felt incongruous at first without plot details to help.

Once the secretiveness let up things really picked up and I was much more engaged with the characters and engrossed in their developing romance. The writing really is enjoyable for this kind of book. There was some repetitiveness in the name of romantic gestures and observations, but pretty intelligent overall.

I have one more complaint though. After all the time and effort to finally get all of the secrets out, after pages and pages of flashbacks, it ends with a measly half page epilogue. Grrrr! With all of the description of the past and the details about how the relationship began and progressed there should have been more details about the future.

So with all of that in mind I still stay I liked the book. If you are looking for something romantic and light but not so light that it’s a waste of time pick this one up. But maybe pick up Edenbrooke first.

View all my reviews

Age Recommendation: 16 and older. An understanding of regency era culture and social norms definitely helps in understanding the conflict.

Appropriateness: Nothing morally wrong here. No swearing, no sex. It would be a fun book club read. I thought the book club discussion questions in the back were actually quite good as well.

Other Book Recommendations: Of course Edenbrooke by Julianne Donaldson would be a good choice if you like this one. There are also several books by Sarah M. Eden that you might enjoy. They are a little cheesier, but still fun. I believe her first book is The Kiss of a Stranger. If you are ready to go straight to the source you should give the original Jane Austen books a try.  My favorites are Pride and Prejudice, Sense and Sensibility, and Persuasion. I would also recommend Princess Academy and The Goose Girl both by Shannon Hale.

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