Remember Me Always

Remember Me AlwaysRemember Me Always by Renee Collins

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Summary (from Goodreads)

Shelby is nervous to start her senior year after spending the whole summer away from home. After all, it’s hard to be carefree when you’re trying to protect a secret.

Shelby was in a devastating car accident, and everyone in town thinks that she was undergoing more physical therapy in Denver. Instead, Shelby’s mother enrolled her in a clinical program to stop the panic attacks that started after the crash. The treatment erased Shelby’s memory of the accident, but she can’t help feeling as if a piece of herself is missing, that the treatment took more than the doctors claimed.

So when Shelby starts hallucinating a boy with dark and mysterious eyes, she knows it must be a side-effect of the clinical program. Except you can’t kiss hallucinations. And this boy insists that they know each other and are in love…

My Review

This was the perfect read for me. After finishing Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein I was looking for something modern and a little less heavy. A good YA romance was just the ticket.

Remember Me Always fits in the YA romance genre perfectly, but it still has a uniqueness in the plot. The idea of technology that can erase traumatic memories was interesting and believable in the presentation. I was drawn in immediately by the mystery surrounding the need for the memory treatment as well as by the intrigue of how it was all going to work out. The writing is easy to read and follow, but with engaging character voice and smart use of language and sentence structure.

I would say that the ending doesn’t fit a traditional “happily ever after” format, but I appreciated it. I was glad to see characters acknowledge their young age and how that should be considered along with feelings of love or passion.

The author lives in a town where I lived for about 4 years and I loved seeing bits and pieces of the town show up in the book’s fictional setting. There were names of people and streets that I recognized. Some of the descriptions of fictional Orchardview brought to mind so clearly places in the real Colorado town.

The book drew me in quickly and was entertaining all the way through  to the end.

Age Recommendation: I think the character’s motivations and the events of the book would be best understood by ages 14 and older.  A 12 year old mature reader would likely enjoy the book as well.

Appropriateness: There is some trauma relating to Shelby’s accident, but descriptions aren’t graphic. There is kissing and physical aspects of a romantic relationship but no specific descriptions or anything that would inappropriate for most YA readers.

Other Book Recommendations: Other books like Remember Me Always include Until We Meet Again also by Renee Collins, Safe House by Shannon Symonds, The Unicorn Hunter by Rachel Kirkaldie, The Selection Series by Kiera Cass, Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins, A Ring of Endless Light by Madeleine L’Engle, Armageddon Summer by Jane Yolen and Bruce Coville, and The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants by Ann Brashares.

 

Eve and Adam

Eve & Adam (Eve & Adam, #1)Eve & Adam by Michael Grant and Katherine Applegate

My rating: 1 of 5 stars

Summary from Goodreads

And girl created boy…

In the beginning, there was an apple—

And then there was a car crash, a horrible injury, and a hospital. But before Evening Spiker’s head clears a strange boy named Solo is rushing her to her mother’s research facility. There, under the best care available, Eve is left alone to heal.

Just when Eve thinks she will die—not from her injuries, but from boredom—her mother gives her a special project: Create the perfect boy.

Using an amazingly detailed simulation, Eve starts building a boy from the ground up. Eve is creating Adam. And he will be just perfect… won’t he?

My Review

I debated whether it was even worth reviewing this one, but in the end I figured I read it so I might as well. Part of my purpose in reviewing is to give myself the exercise in expressing my thoughts and ideas logically and accurately. So even if this books ended up being pretty inconsequential I guess it’s still worth my time to verbalize why.

This book was a bit of an enigma for me. Despite the 1 star rating I gave it, I did get wrapped up in it enough to finish it within just a few hours. However, I contemplated not finishing it multiple times while reading, and then when I got to the end I really wished I hadn’t wasted the time.

I was just browsing the shelves at the library when I saw Eve and Adam. The cover art and the plot description intrigued me so I figured I’d give it a shot, but I didn’t have terribly high expectations. I figured it was most likely going to be just a quick read, probably not much depth, but hopefully not horribly written and with an interesting enough concept to make it at least entertaining. It definitely was a quick read and the writing was good, but the lack of depth in character and plot development was totally dissatisfying. The potential for the concept and the writing is what kept me reading, kept me hoping that just maybe the ending would redeem it from the shallow and way too sex-crazed characters, the hollow and underdeveloped “love” (more like “lust”) story, and the crude and unintelligent swearing. Sadly, no redemption to be found.

Now actually writing out and analyzing all of the things I didn’t like about the book I really wonder why I kept reading. The best explanation I can come up with is that I just wanted to see how it would end, what the deal was with this “perfect” Adam creation. Unfortunately, he is the flattest of all of the characters and really has very little importance overall.

After reading the back cover when I picked the book up at the library I think I was expecting more of a science fiction book. What I got was a badly done YA romance. The driving force in the theme and plot development was the not-so-developed relationships. The genetics and science fiction aspects became simply the backdrop for the hormonal, disrespectful, selfish, insecure, and generally messed up teenagers to think more about themselves and sex, and to think they fell in love after a few superficial conversations.

But I guess I have to give the authors some credit for keeping me on board despite my thoughts of jumping ship. However, I think I’d rather just have back those few hours I spent reading.

Age Recommendation: Lots of talk and thought about sex, innuendos, and lots of swearing. I wouldn’t recommend this book probably at all, but definitely not for under 16.

Appropriateness: Despite there not being any graphic or detailed descriptions of gore or sex, a line was still crossed for my standards.  Way to much swearing for my likes as well, especially since it was mostly the derogatory type.

Other Book Recommendations: If this book sounds interesting you might also like these books (but they are all way better than Eve and Adam) – Watched Series by Cindy M. Hogan, Until We Meet Again by Renee Collins, the Uglies Series by Scott Westerfield, the Maze Runner series by James Dashner, Divergent Series by Veronica Roth, Matched series by Ally Condie, and An Uncommon Blue by R.C. Hancock.