It’s Not Easy Being a Superhero – blog tour

It's Not Easy Being a Superhero: Understanding Sensory Processing DisorderIt’s Not Easy Being a Superhero: Understanding Sensory Processing Disorder by Kelli Call

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Summary from Goodreads

Unlike most superheroes, Clark’s superpowers aren’t a secret. And instead of just one, Clark has five superpowers he must learn to control: super hearing, super sight, super smell, super taste, and super feeling. He uses his five superpowers to defeat sensory triggers, and his arch nemesis Igor Ance. This beautifully illustrated picture book helps parents, teachers, students, and friends understand what it’s like for these superheroes who have sensory processing disorder and the tricks they learn to control their powers.

My Review

I’m so grateful for this book! And excited to be participating in the blog tour.

From infancy we knew there was something “different” about my daughter. The older she got the more apparent it became that she had some unique struggles and strengths to deal with. When a friend told me about Sensory Processing Disorder I started researching like crazy. My daughter has not been officially diagnosed, but what I learned about SPD just fit so much of what we saw in her. Learning about SPD gave us many tools to help her.

So imagine my excitement when I heard about a picture book for kids all about SPD. As a mother and a former school teacher I knew the value of presenting this information in a format that would make sense to kids struggling with SPD and to the children and adults in their lives. So the day the book came I gathered my 4 kids, ages 4-11, and we read it together. All 4 of them were caught up in the ups and downs of the superhero’s powers, and in the illustrations that brought it all to life with exciting colors, movement, and a bit of a classic superhero comic book feel.

When we’d finished reading I asked my kids if they felt like they could relate to Clark at all, or if they knew someone from church or school who maybe reminded them of Clark. I was fascinated that they all could say they related to Clark and having triggers that just set certain feelings or behaviors off. We talked about what things they do now and could do better, just like Clark, to help keep our reactions in check and to calm us down. All 3 of my school age children told me about kids they knew in their current class or in previous classes that they thought had super senses just like Clark, and they felt that the book helped them understand better why they acted in certain ways at times. And it didn’t seem so weird anymore.

My 11 year old, who actually displays SPD behaviors, didn’t stick around too long after we finished discussing. I imagine she felt she was “too old” for picture books, but I loved watching my 7 and 4 year old look through the book again together. When it was time for bed my 7 year old took the book with her. I saw her reading it again in bed. The next morning when I went in to her room she was already awake reading the book again.

I got to thinking about what about it spoke to her in particular. She hasn’t ever seemed to have symptoms of SPD; but she is independent to the extreme. She tends to react suddenly and strongly with her emotions in unpleasant situations, and sometimes even her positive reactions are overly strong or dramatic. We are always working on self-regulation of her emotions, and it struck me that Clark’s sensory superpowers might feel similar to her lack of emotional control. I was inspired to take a new, more positive, approach to her unique struggles; to see her as a future superhero in training, with a lot of strength to offer the world.

I’ll say it again – I am so grateful for this book and the positive discussion it inspired in my family. And for the perspective we all gained. It would be an amazing tool in any classroom or family to help understand the strengths and weaknesses involved in SPD and in all of us. It’s so relatable and understandable. And so very inspiring and positive in a world where we all have hard things, but doing them is what makes us super.

 

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Duck, Duck, Moose

Duck, Duck, MooseDuck, Duck, Moose by Joy Heyer

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Summary (adapted from Goodreads)

Duck’s best friend Goose is gone for winter and Duck is lonely. The animals try to cheer Duck, but Duck, Duck, Pig is too messy, and Duck, Duck, Moose is too scary. Will Duck be alone until Goose gets back? Or can Duck find a way to happily play until Goose gets back?

My Review

Duck, Duck, Moose has all of the elements of the perfect picture book. The story is entertaining for adults and children alike. There aren’t too many words per page and they are fun words to say and hear. The charming illustrations work with the words to tell the full story. Each time we have read this, my kids can’t wait to turn the page to see what problem Duck will find himself in next. I love Duck’s facial expressions. They tell the story in and of themselves.

This book also has a feel good message about friendship and social skills without being annoying or preachy. I love the example duck shows of turning a disappointing situation around with a little problem-solving and a change in attitude. It’s really a plot and message that is relatable to real life. But most importantly, it’s just a positively enjoyable book!

Age Recommendation: I love reading this book over and over with my kids. This one works for the youngest of readers to the oldest.

Appropriateness: Only warm fuzzies and innocence in this one, along with a good dose of wit.

 

Classroom Use: This book would be great inspiration for creative writing exercises.  Students could come up with their own ideas of what traditional games with combinations of animals might look like. What would work well? What wouldn’t?Students could also write about what they thought Goose was doing while he was away. Would be a great study in point of view.

This book is perfect for studying standards related to “main ideas and details” particularly in looking at describing characters in the story.  Because the illustrations are an integral part of showing characters emotions they actually become “text evidence.” The visual text evidence may be more concrete for some learners and help cement the idea of how to find and use text evidence to support conclusions.  This would also apply to teaching standards related to “integration of knowledge and skills.”

Other Book Recommendations: If you like Duck, Duck, Moose or books like it then you should try The Book with No Pictures by B.J. Novak, any Elephant and Piggie or Pigeon books by Mo Willems, Cindy Moo by Lori Mortensen, and Unicorn Thinks He’s Pretty Great by Bob Shea.

From Dark to Light

From Dark to LightFrom Dark to Light by Isabella Murphy

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Summary

Readers meet Pumpker, a little boy pumpkin, when he is just a slim white seed being planted along with his sisters.  Follow his journey of hopes and dreams as he grows to a pumpkin.

My Review

My favorite part of this book was the illustrations. They capture the whimsy of a pumpkin longing for a place to belong and to bring happiness to the world while also capturing the color and feel of autumn and the childhood excitement of Halloween.

The idea of this book is very cute. I was interested in seeing how a young 5th grade author would personify a pumpkin and portray his “life’s journey.” I was impressed by the author’s descriptive writing. However, there were too many words on each page for a picture book. Even as an adult I felt bogged down, so I think young readers will find it difficult to get through the words on each page.

Even with all of the words I didn’t feel completely satisfied in the little pumpkin’s journey. I couldn’t really latch on to a theme or purpose for the story. There wasn’t any one element that tied the stages of development of this pumpkin together so it felt too random. The pumpkin’s character traits weren’t consistent, so the story lacked cohesiveness for me. But the author is young; I have no doubt that with time and more writing she will gain more skill in story building and fleshing out plots and characters. She already possesses a true talent with words so I look forward to seeing more work from her in the future.

While I don’t think young readers will necessarily enjoy this story as much reading it on their own, I do think it has great value as a read-aloud and could be used in so many ways in an elementary school classroom. As a read-aloud you could easily skip some of the overlong text and summarize more quickly the main idea. The illustrations will definitely be able to keep children’s interest.

In the classroom I would love to use this book as an introduction to a creative writing assignment in which students would be required to personify an inanimate object, or to write from a unique perspective. The pumpkin’s journey to find his purpose in life would be a great way to get students’ creative juices flowing.

You could take it a step further even and add a social studies or science correlation. From Dark to Light provides a basic and entertaining view of the stages in seed growth. It also gives some material for the study of communities, occupations, and goods and services. You have the farmer who plants the seed, takes care of and grows the plant, then the consumer who buys and uses it. It would be valuable to read this book and then have students come up with their own story about the stages in seed growth about another type of plant. Or, they could take some other product and write a story to show how it is produced and then used in a community.

With Halloween just around the corner, the most obvious use of this book would be just pure fun and getting kids excited about holiday traditions. From Dark to Light definitely got me thinking about just how I want to carve the perfectly orange pumpkin currently sitting on my front porch.

Age Recommendation: This book is written for young readers and I think ages 3-8 would enjoy it most. However, because there are so many words on each page there may need to be some editing and summarizing to make it more in sync with their attention spans.

Appropriateness: Perfectly clean book with a feel-good ending.

Other Book Recommendations: If you are interested in From Dark to Light then you might also enjoy Big Pumpkin by Erica Silverman, The Biggest, Best Snowman by Margery Cuyler, Zombelina by Kristyn Crow, The Little Old Lady Who Was Not Afraid of Anything by Linda Williams, and Snowmen at Night by Caralyn Buehner.

The Box

theboxcoverThe Box is a new children’s picture book by Yvette Cragun and illustrated by Alex Smith. I had the chance to read it before publication in a digital format in return for an honest review.

The first things I noticed about The Box were the bright and varied colors in the illustrations. Very eye catching.  Then as I began to read the text I loved how it jumps right in to the plot – A boy finds a big box and is excited about all of the paths of imagination it opens. This brings so many memories to my mind; I remember the day my parents bought a new fridge and how excited my sister and I were to have the box that the new fridge came in. It was our time machine, our cave, a house, an airplane, and more. We used to turn even smaller boxes into houses for dolls and stuffed animals.  I think most kids will be able to relate to the plot as well. If they haven’t yet had a the opportunity to have a big cardboard box to play with, they will be begging for one by the time they have finished reading this book.

I enjoyed the rhyme of the text; it tells the story naturally and flows well for the most part. When I read the book to my kids (ages 5-9) there was one line that confused them a little.  Toward the end there is a line that says “She [mom] doesn’t see it,” meaning she’s not on board with the boy moving in to the box and making it his new room. My kids weren’t sure what it was that the mom “didn’t see.” They thought maybe she couldn’t see the box. Other than that my girls understood the story very well and loved the colors. As I predicted, they wanted a big box to play with themselves after we finished reading.

If I were to be super picky I would have one criticism regarding the illustrations. As I already said, I loved the colors and overall I loved the look and feel. They look like crayon or colored pencil drawings which add to the theme of a child’s imagination. However, I thought the illustrations of the boys made them look too old. They looked tall and lanky like my 13 and 14 year old nephews who, unfortunately, by that age would not get much excitement out of a big box.  The perspective in the illustrations is not always perfect, but I actually like that as it adds to the child-like feel, but there is one illustration of the boy’s mom that has a more realistic perspective.  The drawing is well done, but I felt it didn’t fit as well with the more playful perspective of the other illustrations.

Overall, The Box was a satisfying journey of imagination. The storytelling flowed well and provided an entertaining arc and conclusion. I am a third-grade teacher and I look forward to reading The Box to my class and using it to prompt a creative writing project.  After reading the book I will have my students think of other simple items (like a box) that with a little imagination can be used in all kinds of ways. Then they can write a story or a poem describing all the different uses. Isabella’s Pink Umbrella by this same author would be another great book to use for this writing prompt.

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Isabella’s Pink Umbrella (New York)

Isabella's Pink Umbrella New YorkIsabella’s Pink Umbrella New York by Yvette Cragun

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

As a kid I used an umbrella for so many things. Of course it was great to use in the rain, but I loved pretending it was a parasol when it was sunny, and as a big fan of Mary Poppins an umbrella could have all kinds of magical properties as well. So when I read about Isabella’s adventure with her umbrella it just gave me warm fuzzies. My girls often request this book as our bedtime story, so I know it sparks excitement, imagination, and interest for them too. It is also an entertaining way to teach a little about the sights and sounds of New York City.  The rhyming scheme is a fun addition to the storytelling though there are a few parts where the rhyming feels a little awkward.

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Unicorn Thinks He’s Pretty Great

Unicorn Thinks He's Pretty GreatUnicorn Thinks He’s Pretty Great by Bob Shea

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

My first-grader brought this one home from the school library. We all laughed and read it every night that we had it. Beyond the humor is also a great message about recognizing the great things about yourself and others that make you unique and awesome in your own way.

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The Book with No Pictures

The Book with No PicturesThe Book with No Pictures by B.J. Novak
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

My third-grader LOVED this book. She read it multiple times a day while we had it from the library. She wanted us to read it to her every day too. She just couldn’t wait to hear her parents say silly things. Definitely a clever one and it made us all laugh the first half a dozen times or so. After that the kids still loved it. If “a hippo named boo boo butt” makes you laugh then you better read The Book with No Pictures to your kids.

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